Master Emergency Control Point: Chief Warden: Emergency Plan

AUST – Emergency Plan advises most emergency response procedures under AS 3745-2010 ‘Planning for emergencies in facilities’ include the expectation that in an emergency, (and if safe to do so), the Chief Warden will proceed to the master emergency control point and take control of the emergency, and utilise the sound and intercom systems. But what if a building, the Chief Warden and the master emergency control point are destined to be a bad fit? The decision on the location of the master emergency control point is based upon the systems and pathways of travel (exit path) in a building. If the

Evacuation Exercise: Trial Evacuations: When Things Go Wrong

Work Place Safety Assessors advise that observing trial evacuations (evacuation exercise) from facilities there has been plenty of opportunity to witness interesting incidents. ‘Facilities’ can refer to a wide range of buildings such as office blocks, factories, warehouses, hotels and schools.  Many of these incidents are revealing, in that the evacuations were stressful,  inspiring or educational. Trial evacuations are valuable for working out if emergency response equipment works the way it is supposed to and if people know how to use it. Here are some good examples: In a school with an EWIS (SSIS) system, the wardens were asked to use the Warden

Emergency Control Organisation: Chief Warden Training

AUST – Emergency Plan advises that under AS 3745-2010 ‘Planning for emergencies in facilities’, there are many critical aspects to a safe response to an emergency in a facility such as a building or other work place. All the planning documents and evacuation diagrams that have been created in the preparation of emergency planning will only support the actions taken by those involved, and one of the roles in the Emergency Control Organisation that can greatly influence the effectiveness of response is that of the Chief Warden. During an emergency, the instructions given by the Emergency Control Organisation take precedence over the normal management structure, and therefore the Chief Warden, with the responsibility to direct the Emergency Control Organisation,

Chief Warden: Training: Emergency Plan: AS 3745 – 2010

AUST – Emergency Plan training programs are designed for Emergency Control Organisation (ECO) members who are required under AS3745 – 2010 ‘Planning for emergencies in facilities’ to be trained in the position of chief warden, deputy chief warden and communications officer. Chief warden training is the pivotal role in ensuring the ECO outcomes are achieved. Chief Warden Training Outcomes Emergency plan training will ensure that staff develop skills to appreciate the extent of onsite workplace emergencies and that the chief warden training covers the safe evacuation of the workplace. Chief warden training covers AS3745-2010 ‘Planning for emergencies in facilities’, in particular ECO and

Emergency Control Organisation: Emergency Plan

AUST - Emergency Plan advises that AS 3745-2010 ‘Planning for emergencies in facilities’ defines the Emergency Control Organisation as “a person or persons appointed by the emergency planning committee to direct and control the implementation of the facility’s emergency response procedures.” At a minimum, the Emergency Control Organisation is required to consist of a chief warden or equivalent… (more) Work Health Safety Legislation: Emergency Control Organisation Refer to our Work Health Safety Legislation Table for further statutory information on safe occupation of a building including the Emergency Control Organisation.

Master Emergency Control Point: Chief Warden: Emergency Plan

AUST - Emergency Plan advises most emergency response procedures under AS 3745-2010 'Planning for emergencies in facilities' include the expectation that in an emergency, (and if safe to do so), the Chief Warden will proceed to the master emergency control point and take control of the emergency, and utilise the sound and intercom systems. But what if a building, the Chief Warden and the master emergency control point are destined to be a bad fit? The decision on the location of the master emergency control point is based upon the systems and pathways of travel (exit path) in a building. If the

Chief Warden: Master Emergency Control Point: Emergency Plan

AUST – Emergency Plan advises most emergency response procedures under AS 3745-2010 'Planning for emergencies in facilities' include the expectation that in an emergency, (and if safe to do so), the Chief Warden will proceed to the master emergency control point and take control of the emergency, and utilise the sound and intercom systems. But what if a building, the Chief Warden and the master emergency control point are destined to be a bad fit? The decision on the location of the master emergency control point is based upon the systems and pathways of travel (exit path) in a building.

Emergency Plan: AS 3745-2010: Chief Warden Training

SA - Emergency Plan advises that in addition to training for all Emergency Control Organisation members, Australian Standard AS 3745-2010 – ‘Planning for emergencies in facilities’ mandates Chief Warden training, which also includes their deputies and communication officers having additional training to ensure they possess the necessary knowledge and skills to command, control and coordinate a facility’s emergency control organisation. Such training should include but not be limited to… (more) Work Health Safety Legislation Refer to our Work Health Safety Legislation Table for further statutory information on safe occupation of a building.

Chief Warden Training: Emergency Control Organisation: Emergency Plan

AUST – Emergency Plan advises that under AS 3745-2010 ‘Planning for emergencies in facilities’, there are many critical aspects to a safe response to an emergency in a facility such as a building or other work place. All the planning documents and evacuation diagrams that have been created in the preparation of emergency planning will only support the actions taken by those involved, and one of the roles in the Emergency Control Organisation that can greatly influence the effectiveness of response is that of the Chief Warden. During an emergency, the instructions given by the Emergency Control Organisation take precedence

Chief Warden Master Emergency Control Point: Emergency Plan

AUST – Emergency Plan advises most emergency response procedures under AS 3745-2010 – Planning for emergencies in buildings include the expectation that in an emergency, (and if safe to do so), the Chief Warden will proceed to the master emergency control point and take control of the emergency, and utilise the sound and intercom systems. But what if a building, the Chief Warden and the master emergency control point are destined to be a bad fit? The decision on the location of the master emergency control point is based upon the systems and pathways of travel in a building. If